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Podcasting Experiments

Podcasting Experiments is all about experimenting with your podcast. We explore ways you can implement and test different ideas to improve your podcast by looking at different strategies and ideas from other podcasters.
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Now displaying: Page 6
Jul 18, 2014

Greg Hickman is the host of the Mobile Mixed Marketing Podcast. He is here today to talk about the importance of putting mobile first as we create content. Greg got started in mobile in 2005, and saw that there was a great opportunity. He also has the Mobile

Check out Greg's website and podcast or connect with him on Twitter.
What are some the major aspects of mobile for people to consider?
Most social networks, podcasts, email, etc are done on mobile devices.

Even for a brick-and-mortar store, you need to realize that your customers are using mobile.
How should we approach the mobile experience as we get started creating content?
Mobile-first means to think about the mobile experience first. This way you are thinking about the limitations first and creating for that. As you move from mobile to desktop, you can expand as needed for that medium.

Mobile-first forces you to focus on the most important message to give to the customer.
What are your thoughts about responsive design vs creating a mobile-specific website?

Fully responsive - a site that displays differently based on the screen size, making it much easier to view and interact with on mobile devices.
Mobile-specific site - a second site that is just for mobile devices.
Mobile-responsive - hybrid between the two. It uses a second site that is responsive, and slowly makes the mobile-responsive into the full responsive site.

What are some SMS strategies?
Greg has written the SMS Marketing Handbook that covers a lot of great things regarding SMS and MMS marketing.

Responses with text messaging is much higher. People are much quicker to check their text messages, and may be more likely to respond.

There are still many people that don't have smart phones, but they still have SMS available.

If you are wondering if SMS could work for you, ask "what is your objective?"
What are your thoughts about QR Codes?
There are a few good ways to use them, but most don't use them correctly.

One obstacle to QR codes is that many people don't know how to use them. Those that do know, may find it a hassle to properly scan it. Many people could type in the web address faster than scanning a QR code.

Another consideration is to make sure that the address it goes to is mobile-friendly. Don't make people pinch-and-zoom!
What are some thing that we can do optimize their sites to improve the speed of their site?
Image size, the number of redirects, and server calls are the three common things that you can minimize to help the site to load faster.
Question: Have you really considered how your content is consumed by clients on mobile devices?

The post Greg Hickman Discusses the Importance of a Mobile-mindset (1-5) appeared first on Creative Studio Academy.

Jul 17, 2014

1.         Website Hosting
You can’t have a website without hosting it on some server. You could buy and maintain your own server, but that can take a lot of skill, time, and money. When it comes to getting a hosting service, there are a couple options:

Shared hosting
Dedicated hosting
Virtual Private Server

The host that I use and recommend is BlueHost.
2.         WordPress
You can use different methods of constructing your website, but my recommendation is to use WordPress. It is power and relatively simple to learn. To understand how WordPress works, imagine your website as a car. You basically have a frame, a body, an engine, and additional features.

WordPress is the engine. It makes everything run.
A theme is the frame and body. It is how the website looks.
Plugins are the additional features. It is how the website functions.

Regarding themes, there is a wide variety. There are thousands of free themes available in the WordPress repository. There are also a lot of themes that you can purchase, and the prices vary from tens to hundreds of dollars. What is best? Well, the one that does what you need it to. While there are many advantages to paid themes, sometimes a free theme fits the job best. I’ve experienced this while working with a few clients.

Along with themes, there are frameworks. These add extra functionality to themes. One such framework is the Genesis framework. They look great and have a lot of functionality built in. I’ve used the Genesis framework and themes for over a year, and have enjoyed working with them.
3.         About Page
One of the vital pages beyond the homepage, is your About page. Here is a bullet list from Michael Hyatt's book, "Platform:"

Write in the first person
Write in a conversational style
Start with the reader's priorities
Tell them about yourself (brief summary)
Tell them about your blog/website
Set their expectations
Invite them to subscribe
Point them to your top posts
Provide a full biography
Tell them how to contact you
Include a photo or video
Add a colophon
Consider a disclaimer

4.         Contact Page
After your About page, you need a page that tells people how they can contact and interact with you.
5.         E-mail List
They say that “the money is in the list.” So you should get an e-mail list and promote it on your website.
Question: As a website visitor/user, what things do you look for to see if you will stay longer or come back later?

The post 5 Key Components for Your Website (1-4) appeared first on Creative Studio Academy.

Jul 17, 2014

1.         Website Hosting
You can’t have a website without hosting it on some server. You could buy and maintain your own server, but that can take a lot of skill, time, and money. When it comes to getting a hosting service, there are a couple options:

Shared hosting
Dedicated hosting
Virtual Private Server

The host that I use and recommend is BlueHost.
2.         WordPress
You can use different methods of constructing your website, but my recommendation is to use WordPress. It is power and relatively simple to learn. To understand how WordPress works, imagine your website as a car. You basically have a frame, a body, an engine, and additional features.

WordPress is the engine. It makes everything run.
A theme is the frame and body. It is how the website looks.
Plugins are the additional features. It is how the website functions.

Regarding themes, there is a wide variety. There are thousands of free themes available in the WordPress repository. There are also a lot of themes that you can purchase, and the prices vary from tens to hundreds of dollars. What is best? Well, the one that does what you need it to. While there are many advantages to paid themes, sometimes a free theme fits the job best. I’ve experienced this while working with a few clients.

Along with themes, there are frameworks. These add extra functionality to themes. One such framework is the Genesis framework. They look great and have a lot of functionality built in. I’ve used the Genesis framework and themes for over a year, and have enjoyed working with them.
3.         About Page
One of the vital pages beyond the homepage, is your About page. Here is a bullet list from Michael Hyatt's book, "Platform:"

Write in the first person
Write in a conversational style
Start with the reader's priorities
Tell them about yourself (brief summary)
Tell them about your blog/website
Set their expectations
Invite them to subscribe
Point them to your top posts
Provide a full biography
Tell them how to contact you
Include a photo or video
Add a colophon
Consider a disclaimer

4.         Contact Page
After your About page, you need a page that tells people how they can contact and interact with you.
5.         E-mail List
They say that “the money is in the list.” So you should get an e-mail list and promote it on your website.
Question: As a website visitor/user, what things do you look for to see if you will stay longer or come back later?

The post 5 Key Components for Your Website (1-4) appeared first on Creative Studio Academy.

Jul 16, 2014

Mark Sieverkropp has been a friend and co-host on another podcast. He started off blogging a few years ago, with topics such as soccer, leadership, and now more on networking. He has also written the e-book, "Project:Success." He has also been the co-host of the Happen to Your Career podcast, which including doing some video as well. You can connect with him on his website or on Twitter.
How does Mark keep his determination and dedication while pursuing his dream and creating content?

One thing that is nice, is that you can do it whenever you want. Mark likes to do it early in the morning before starting his regular job.
Find and work with people that help fuel your passion. There are so many people that are creating content, that it's easier to find people that are passionate about the same things you are passionate about.

Mark shares some things about his e-book, "Project: Success"

Defining things as a project helps by having a deadline. It also helps by changing your view of it, and failure doesn't seem so bad.
For example, instead of starting a podcast with no end in sight, determine to go 15 episodes and go from there.
Mark's book was an inspiration for this site and podcast, in that I started calling this a project.
Most of our problems are mental.
Realize that things have a beginning. And they have an end.
It helps you to get past the mental road blocks.

Successes and Benefits from Mark's perspective

Mark lives in a small town, but he's been able to meet and develop relationships with people all over the country and world. These would never have been possible without creating content online.
Blogging has helped Mark to focus and crystalize his thoughts. He can now write much easier and faster. Blogging has also helped him to prepare for speeches and oral communication.
He's always wanted to be involved in business training, and online content creation has helped him to open doors in that area.

What are some of the struggles and failures that Mark has had?

Creating content online has both positives and negatives. If you're not intentional, it's easy to lose your motivation or do it alone.
It's easy to focus on yourself and your own passions. You need to focus on your audience!
Thinking that it's different than "regular" life. It's all still about relationships and developing them.

How do you find out what your audience wants?

After a while, Mark and Scott (Happen to Your Career podcast) reached out to the audience and asked them for feedback.

Final words of wisdom from Mark

Just get started.
Start small, and learn from there.

Share your takeaways below!

The post Mark Sieverkropp Shares the Benefits and Struggles of Content Creation (1-3) appeared first on Creative Studio Academy.

Jul 16, 2014

Mark Sieverkropp has been a friend and co-host on another podcast. He started off blogging a few years ago, with topics such as soccer, leadership, and now more on networking. He has also written the e-book, "Project:Success." He has also been the co-host of the Happen to Your Career podcast, which including doing some video as well. You can connect with him on his website or on Twitter.
How does Mark keep his determination and dedication while pursuing his dream and creating content?

One thing that is nice, is that you can do it whenever you want. Mark likes to do it early in the morning before starting his regular job.
Find and work with people that help fuel your passion. There are so many people that are creating content, that it's easier to find people that are passionate about the same things you are passionate about.

Mark shares some things about his e-book, "Project: Success"

Defining things as a project helps by having a deadline. It also helps by changing your view of it, and failure doesn't seem so bad.
For example, instead of starting a podcast with no end in sight, determine to go 15 episodes and go from there.
Mark's book was an inspiration for this site and podcast, in that I started calling this a project.
Most of our problems are mental.
Realize that things have a beginning. And they have an end.
It helps you to get past the mental road blocks.

Successes and Benefits from Mark's perspective

Mark lives in a small town, but he's been able to meet and develop relationships with people all over the country and world. These would never have been possible without creating content online.
Blogging has helped Mark to focus and crystalize his thoughts. He can now write much easier and faster. Blogging has also helped him to prepare for speeches and oral communication.
He's always wanted to be involved in business training, and online content creation has helped him to open doors in that area.

What are some of the struggles and failures that Mark has had?

Creating content online has both positives and negatives. If you're not intentional, it's easy to lose your motivation or do it alone.
It's easy to focus on yourself and your own passions. You need to focus on your audience!
Thinking that it's different than "regular" life. It's all still about relationships and developing them.

How do you find out what your audience wants?

After a while, Mark and Scott (Happen to Your Career podcast) reached out to the audience and asked them for feedback.

Final words of wisdom from Mark

Just get started.
Start small, and learn from there.

Share your takeaways below!

The post Mark Sieverkropp Shares the Benefits and Struggles of Content Creation (1-3) appeared first on Creative Studio Academy.

Jul 15, 2014

Have you been crawling along the Internet “Super Highway” while others are zipping by? Maybe you haven’t quite merged into the traffic yet. Or maybe you’ve had a website for years, but aren’t getting the results you’ve hoped for.
That’s to be expected. Even if your website is sporting the newest bells and whistles. Dynamic and flashy media is good, but it’s not everything.
Just having a great website isn’t enough.
In this new world of information, you need to be creating content. Not just a static page on your website, but content that is constantly fresh. Just think: if a restaurant only ordered fresh food on the first of the month, customers would stop coming pretty quickly. Who wants a sandwich from two weeks ago?
So, how do you go about creating new content online? There are several avenues to choose from, with blogging and podcasting being two great and growing options. It doesn’t stop with those, and we’ll dive in deeper to what we can do, why to do it, and how to make it happen.
I’ve been involved in offline content creation for many years. Online, I’ve been blogging for over two years and podcasting for over one year. Maybe not a long stretch compared to some others, but I’ve learned a lot over that time. I plan to share my experience and knowledge to help you in your journey. Along the way, I’ll bring on special guest experts in these different areas to bring your content creation to a new level and, hopefully, show you how to simplify the process.

A website is not enough
In Michael Hyatt's book, Platform, he emphasizes that a website isn't enough. The mentality of "build it and they will come" doesn't work. Even just having great content doesn't stand on its own.
I've tried this.
When I started seriously blogging in 2012, I had a good looking website and great content. But I didn't have an audience. Even when i tried to promote on Twitter, I had so few followers, it didn't make much of a difference.
I didn't start seeing any growth until I started interacting with others online. I found some blogs to follow and interact with both the blogger (in this case, Chris LoCurto) and the others that were commenting. I started learning better ways to utilize Twitter (it's more than just following others and hoping they follow back). Throughout 2013, I grew my Twitter following from 200 to over 600 - not impressive numbers, but it's still a 300% growth. I started to see my stats improve on my website as well. My numbers suffered when I got busy and inconsistent.
So, again, you need more than a great, quality website.
For a business owner, a website isn't enough to bring traffic. You have to do something to bring them in.
We're going to look at three main things:

Blogging
Podcasting
Video

Blogging
This is a great way to provide fresh content to your website. With a blog, the newest post displays first and the rest show in reverse chronological order (newest to oldest). Not only will your site visitors enjoy seeing new content, Google rates sites with new, fresh content better.

Podcasting
Podcasting has done great things for me. I've been able to reach a much bigger audience than I did with just my blog. I've also been able to interview famous authors, and even an actor from the show 24 (I did a podcast called The 24 Podcast with a friend). It's a great way to build your reputation and expand your reach.

Video
Video takes interaction to a new level, as you are able to convey more of your meaning and personality. You also can take advantage of YouTube, which is the second largest search engine in the world behind Google.

Social Media
Social media, if done right, can really help you increase the traffic to your website. We'll talk more about social media and networking in future sessions.

Questions:

Have you started any of these?

Jul 15, 2014

Have you been crawling along the Internet “Super Highway” while others are zipping by? Maybe you haven’t quite merged into the traffic yet. Or maybe you’ve had a website for years, but aren’t getting the results you’ve hoped for.
That’s to be expected. Even if your website is sporting the newest bells and whistles. Dynamic and flashy media is good, but it’s not everything.
Just having a great website isn’t enough.
In this new world of information, you need to be creating content. Not just a static page on your website, but content that is constantly fresh. Just think: if a restaurant only ordered fresh food on the first of the month, customers would stop coming pretty quickly. Who wants a sandwich from two weeks ago?
So, how do you go about creating new content online? There are several avenues to choose from, with blogging and podcasting being two great and growing options. It doesn’t stop with those, and we’ll dive in deeper to what we can do, why to do it, and how to make it happen.
I’ve been involved in offline content creation for many years. Online, I’ve been blogging for over two years and podcasting for over one year. Maybe not a long stretch compared to some others, but I’ve learned a lot over that time. I plan to share my experience and knowledge to help you in your journey. Along the way, I’ll bring on special guest experts in these different areas to bring your content creation to a new level and, hopefully, show you how to simplify the process.

A website is not enough
In Michael Hyatt's book, Platform, he emphasizes that a website isn't enough. The mentality of "build it and they will come" doesn't work. Even just having great content doesn't stand on its own.
I've tried this.
When I started seriously blogging in 2012, I had a good looking website and great content. But I didn't have an audience. Even when i tried to promote on Twitter, I had so few followers, it didn't make much of a difference.
I didn't start seeing any growth until I started interacting with others online. I found some blogs to follow and interact with both the blogger (in this case, Chris LoCurto) and the others that were commenting. I started learning better ways to utilize Twitter (it's more than just following others and hoping they follow back). Throughout 2013, I grew my Twitter following from 200 to over 600 - not impressive numbers, but it's still a 300% growth. I started to see my stats improve on my website as well. My numbers suffered when I got busy and inconsistent.
So, again, you need more than a great, quality website.
For a business owner, a website isn't enough to bring traffic. You have to do something to bring them in.
We're going to look at three main things:

Blogging
Podcasting
Video

Blogging
This is a great way to provide fresh content to your website. With a blog, the newest post displays first and the rest show in reverse chronological order (newest to oldest). Not only will your site visitors enjoy seeing new content, Google rates sites with new, fresh content better.

Podcasting
Podcasting has done great things for me. I've been able to reach a much bigger audience than I did with just my blog. I've also been able to interview famous authors, and even an actor from the show 24 (I did a podcast called The 24 Podcast with a friend). It's a great way to build your reputation and expand your reach.

Video
Video takes interaction to a new level, as you are able to convey more of your meaning and personality. You also can take advantage of YouTube, which is the second largest search engine in the world behind Google.

Social Media
Social media, if done right, can really help you increase the traffic to your website. We'll talk more about social media and networking in future sessions.

Questions:

Have you started any of these?

Jul 14, 2014

Welcome to the Creative Studio Academy.

This is the podcast to help you learn and explore how you can start and improve your skills with online content creation.
My name is Joshua Rivers and will be your guide on this journey.

Impostor syndrome
I started this podcast with the sentence, "I'm an imposter."

Let me explain. This is a challenge set forth from a fellow podcaster, Cliff Ravenscraft. He is the host of many podcasts, including the Podcast Answer Man. He addresses and answers people's questions about podcasting, and he addressed the issue of the "imposter syndrome" recently.

The "imposter syndrome" is basically the idea of someone pretending to be something that they are not. For example, I am not an absolute expert with online content creation, but I would be an imposter if I was pretending that I was.

Cliff's challenge was to his listeners that were starting a new podcast to start with the phrase, "I'm an imposter."

But, like I said, I'm not really an imposter. I'm not pretending to be an expert in the area of online content creation, which is the theme of this podcast and the associated website, CreativeStudio.Academy.

What does this mean for you?

It means that you don’t have to be an expert either. You can go out and share what you know with others that are coming behind you. Yes, you still need to learn more. But you also have a lot that you can share. Even if there are others out there sharing the same thing, no one else has your exact experience and personality. You bring something fresh to the table.
Who am I?

Website consultant
Blogger
Podcaster
Author
Guide at the Creative Studio Academy

What is the Creative Studio Academy?

CSA is the ultimate place for those starting and growing with online content creation.
The name:

Creative – relating to or involving the imagination or original ideas, especially in the production of an artistic work.
Studio – a place where an artist, photographer, sculptor, etc., works.
Academy – a place of study or training in a special field; a society or institution of distinguished scholars, artists, or scientists, that aims to promote and maintain standards in its particular field.
This is a place where you learn and experiment with creating things, specifically content, in various forms.

What can you expect?

First of all, CSA is an extension of my business, so there are going to be avenues of revenue
Podcast sessions
Expert guests
Solo shows
Expect to have sessions in semesters (seasons)
Blog posts
Tutorials
Membership site (possible) or closed Facebook group
Courses
Group
Individual (self-paced and one-on-one)
Products
Affiliates/Ads/Sponsors
E-mail newsletter
Updates for new posts and sessions
Special articles and interviews just for subscribers
Discounts on products and services

This session is brought to you by Dev By JR.

The post I’m an Impostor: Introductions (1-1) appeared first on Creative Studio Academy.

Jul 14, 2014

Welcome to the Creative Studio Academy.

This is the podcast to help you learn and explore how you can start and improve your skills with online content creation.
My name is Joshua Rivers and will be your guide on this journey.

Impostor syndrome
I started this podcast with the sentence, "I'm an imposter."

Let me explain. This is a challenge set forth from a fellow podcaster, Cliff Ravenscraft. He is the host of many podcasts, including the Podcast Answer Man. He addresses and answers people's questions about podcasting, and he addressed the issue of the "imposter syndrome" recently.

The "imposter syndrome" is basically the idea of someone pretending to be something that they are not. For example, I am not an absolute expert with online content creation, but I would be an imposter if I was pretending that I was.

Cliff's challenge was to his listeners that were starting a new podcast to start with the phrase, "I'm an imposter."

But, like I said, I'm not really an imposter. I'm not pretending to be an expert in the area of online content creation, which is the theme of this podcast and the associated website, CreativeStudio.Academy.

What does this mean for you?

It means that you don’t have to be an expert either. You can go out and share what you know with others that are coming behind you. Yes, you still need to learn more. But you also have a lot that you can share. Even if there are others out there sharing the same thing, no one else has your exact experience and personality. You bring something fresh to the table.
Who am I?

Website consultant
Blogger
Podcaster
Author
Guide at the Creative Studio Academy

What is the Creative Studio Academy?

CSA is the ultimate place for those starting and growing with online content creation.
The name:

Creative – relating to or involving the imagination or original ideas, especially in the production of an artistic work.
Studio – a place where an artist, photographer, sculptor, etc., works.
Academy – a place of study or training in a special field; a society or institution of distinguished scholars, artists, or scientists, that aims to promote and maintain standards in its particular field.
This is a place where you learn and experiment with creating things, specifically content, in various forms.

What can you expect?

First of all, CSA is an extension of my business, so there are going to be avenues of revenue
Podcast sessions
Expert guests
Solo shows
Expect to have sessions in semesters (seasons)
Blog posts
Tutorials
Membership site (possible) or closed Facebook group
Courses
Group
Individual (self-paced and one-on-one)
Products
Affiliates/Ads/Sponsors
E-mail newsletter
Updates for new posts and sessions
Special articles and interviews just for subscribers
Discounts on products and services

This session is brought to you by Dev By JR.

The post I’m an Impostor: Introductions (1-1) appeared first on Creative Studio Academy.

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