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Podcasting Experiments

Podcasting Experiments is all about experimenting with your podcast. We explore ways you can implement and test different ideas to improve your podcast by looking at different strategies and ideas from other podcasters.
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Now displaying: March, 2015
Mar 28, 2015

In today's session, our guest is Steve Stewart from the Money Plan SOS and The Financial Wellness Show. He talks about his podcasting journey, how it is helping him work toward self-employment, the different types of podcasting formats, and the Pretty Link plugin (both the free and the pro versions).

 
Solo show
The solo show is pretty obvious: you do the show alone. You prepare your notes or script and then record it by yourself. Of course, you could choose to have a live audience while you record, but yours is the only voice on the show.
Interview show
A popular podcast format is bringing different people on and interviewing them. This kind of format allows you to have another person to talk to, making it easier to have a flowing conversation. You are also able to bring (potentially) two audiences together (yours and your guests), making it a win-win for both people involved. Depending on your experience and personality, this can be an easy format to utilize.
Co-hosted show
A co-host can be great to provide an additional person, but brings more stability than the interview-based podcast. You and your co-host can develop a great relationship and the listeners can learn to expect the varying opinions. A caution here: both of you should love the topic, but if you both have the exact same opinion, then one of you isn't necessary.
Feature show
Box of Inspirations podcast is an example of a different format where the host is not on the show himself. He gets on Skype with his guests and has them share their inspirational story.
Story-driven show
Several podcasts, such as Serial, have become more popular. This is where there is a story that drives the podcast forward, usually spanning multiple episodes. Stories can be really engaging, but this format of a podcast can be more work than some of the others.

 

The post Steve Stewart (@moneyplansos) talks about his podcasting journey (3-3) appeared first on Creative Studio Academy.

Mar 27, 2015

In today's session, our guest is Steve Stewart from the Money Plan SOS and The Financial Wellness Show. He talks about his podcasting journey, how it is helping him work toward self-employment, the different types of podcasting formats, and the Pretty Link plugin (both the free and the pro versions).

 
Solo show
The solo show is pretty obvious: you do the show alone. You prepare your notes or script and then record it by yourself. Of course, you could choose to have a live audience while you record, but yours is the only voice on the show.
Interview show
A popular podcast format is bringing different people on and interviewing them. This kind of format allows you to have another person to talk to, making it easier to have a flowing conversation. You are also able to bring (potentially) two audiences together (yours and your guests), making it a win-win for both people involved. Depending on your experience and personality, this can be an easy format to utilize.
Co-hosted show
A co-host can be great to provide an additional person, but brings more stability than the interview-based podcast. You and your co-host can develop a great relationship and the listeners can learn to expect the varying opinions. A caution here: both of you should love the topic, but if you both have the exact same opinion, then one of you isn't necessary.
Feature show
Box of Inspirations podcast is an example of a different format where the host is not on the show himself. He gets on Skype with his guests and has them share their inspirational story.
Story-driven show
Several podcasts, such as Serial, have become more popular. This is where there is a story that drives the podcast forward, usually spanning multiple episodes. Stories can be really engaging, but this format of a podcast can be more work than some of the others.

 

The post Steve Stewart (@moneyplansos) talks about his podcasting journey (3-3) appeared first on Creative Studio Academy.

Mar 19, 2015

When it comes to podcasting, everyone seems to be concerned about the technology.

This is our second session about how to podcast, and we'll be talking about this topic. Technology covers both the hardware (like the microphones, mixers, and recorders) and the software. This will not be a deep dive into all of this - there's too much to cover in one episode - but we'll give you enough to get you going in the right direction. If you have specific question, feel free to reach out to either me or to our guest, Ray Ortega.

Ray Ortega comes on the show today to share his insight and excitement about podcasting technology. He's always playing with different equipment and experimenting with audio techniques. This is because podcasting is his full-time job and his night-time hobby. He is the host of The Podcaster's Studio and the Podcasters Roundtable.

Podcasting hardware
Here's some of the major podcasting hardware that you may use:

Microphone - A microphone is one of the basic pieces of equipment that a podcaster needs. There is a wide range of microphone options, from the built-in microphone in your computer/laptop to high-dollar, professional microphones. For podcasting (or any other "professional" audio recording), I recommend not using the built-in microphone - the quality is really low. In the episode, Ray explains a little bit about condenser and dynamic microphones. A strong recommendation for a good podcasting microphone is the ATR2100 or ATR2005 - they both have a USB connection (straight to the computer) and an XLR connection (to a mixer).

Audio mixer - An audio mixer is another great piece of equipment to help with podcasting. It's certainly not necessary. I only got a mixer recently and I've podcasted for two years without one. Again, there's a big range, and Ray talks about this a little bit in the episode.

Digital audio recorder - You can record using software on your computer or mobile device, but a digital audio recorder can be a great help. Software can occasionally crash or add noise to the recording, so a recorder can help with that. Ray discusses some of his recommendations in the episode.

Pop filter - A pop filter is a round screen that goes between your mouth and the microphone. It's job is to reduce the harshness of the plosives (p's, t's, etc.) and mouth noises (lip smacks, etc.).

Windscreen - A windscreen is the foam ball that goes over the microphone. It helps to reduce background noise a little, and it can also reduce some of the plosives.
Podcasting software
Audacity - Audacity is a free recording software that is fairly powerful. Some of the effects are easier with paid software, but Audacity can do a great job for many podcasters.

Adobe Audition - Adobe Audition is a paid piece of software that makes it easier than Audacity to work with the audio. I personally haven't used it, but Ray talks about this in the episode.

Bossjock Studio - Some people record into Bossjock on their mobile device. I haven't really used it for recording, but I have used it for mixing music and sounds. You can save different audio clips into the app that you can turn on and off with a simple button push. I have sound clips on my phone and then put that into my mixer so I can record some of the sounds as I record my voice.

Garageband - This is another popular app that people use to record podcasts. It can also be used for some editing and uploading the episodes. I haven't use it, but I've heard others talk about it.

 

The post How to tackle the podcasting technology (3-2) appeared first on Creative Studio Academy.

Mar 19, 2015

When it comes to podcasting, everyone seems to be concerned about the technology.

This is our second session about how to podcast, and we'll be talking about this topic. Technology covers both the hardware (like the microphones, mixers, and recorders) and the software. This will not be a deep dive into all of this - there's too much to cover in one episode - but we'll give you enough to get you going in the right direction. If you have specific question, feel free to reach out to either me or to our guest, Ray Ortega.

Ray Ortega comes on the show today to share his insight and excitement about podcasting technology. He's always playing with different equipment and experimenting with audio techniques. This is because podcasting is his full-time job and his night-time hobby. He is the host of The Podcaster's Studio and the Podcasters Roundtable.

Podcasting hardware
Here's some of the major podcasting hardware that you may use:

Microphone - A microphone is one of the basic pieces of equipment that a podcaster needs. There is a wide range of microphone options, from the built-in microphone in your computer/laptop to high-dollar, professional microphones. For podcasting (or any other "professional" audio recording), I recommend not using the built-in microphone - the quality is really low. In the episode, Ray explains a little bit about condenser and dynamic microphones. A strong recommendation for a good podcasting microphone is the ATR2100 or ATR2005 - they both have a USB connection (straight to the computer) and an XLR connection (to a mixer).

Audio mixer - An audio mixer is another great piece of equipment to help with podcasting. It's certainly not necessary. I only got a mixer recently and I've podcasted for two years without one. Again, there's a big range, and Ray talks about this a little bit in the episode.

Digital audio recorder - You can record using software on your computer or mobile device, but a digital audio recorder can be a great help. Software can occasionally crash or add noise to the recording, so a recorder can help with that. Ray discusses some of his recommendations in the episode.

Pop filter - A pop filter is a round screen that goes between your mouth and the microphone. It's job is to reduce the harshness of the plosives (p's, t's, etc.) and mouth noises (lip smacks, etc.).

Windscreen - A windscreen is the foam ball that goes over the microphone. It helps to reduce background noise a little, and it can also reduce some of the plosives.
Podcasting software
Audacity - Audacity is a free recording software that is fairly powerful. Some of the effects are easier with paid software, but Audacity can do a great job for many podcasters.

Adobe Audition - Adobe Audition is a paid piece of software that makes it easier than Audacity to work with the audio. I personally haven't used it, but Ray talks about this in the episode.

Bossjock Studio - Some people record into Bossjock on their mobile device. I haven't really used it for recording, but I have used it for mixing music and sounds. You can save different audio clips into the app that you can turn on and off with a simple button push. I have sound clips on my phone and then put that into my mixer so I can record some of the sounds as I record my voice.

Garageband - This is another popular app that people use to record podcasts. It can also be used for some editing and uploading the episodes. I haven't use it, but I've heard others talk about it.

 

The post How to tackle the podcasting technology (3-2) appeared first on Creative Studio Academy.

Mar 13, 2015

This session kicks off the 3rd semester of the Creative Studio Academy. We'll be covering how to podcast. It will be directed mostly toward new podcasters, giving you the basics tools and information to get started with podcasting - hopefully avoiding the pitfalls and difficulties.

In this session, we'll be talking with Zac Bob from the Crowdfund Genius and Crowdfunding Comebacks podcasts. He is also one of the co-founders of OKpod15, a one-day podcasting event for small businesses in Oklahoma City. We'll talk about the importance of knowing your audience and knowing why you want to podcast. Both of these are key ingredients to make it passed the podcasting honeymoon phase.
Know your audience
I know you’re excited about starting your podcast, but there are several things you need to nail down first. The first and most important thing is your audience. It is the most important thing to know before your start, and it is still the most important thing as your grow and maintain.

At this point, you may or may not have an audience already. Maybe you already have a blog or YouTube channel with followers already. Maybe you just have a Facebook profile with some family and friends. Maybe you’re wondering what Facebook is.

No matter what your current status is, you need to figure out and understand who exactly you are trying to reach. This is a process of being very specific. Saying that you are targeting males 18-80 that love fishing is not good enough.

Here is one thing to think of to help you: your target audience is one person. Not one kind of person. One person.

That one person cannot fulfill every demographic or psychographic category. They cannot be 18 and 80 at the same time. They cannot live in the US and in Germany at the same time. Be very specific to describe this person.

Here’s some questions to help you get started:

What is his/her name? (that’s right - a name)
How old is he?
Is he married? How long?
Does he have kids? How many? Names, ages, etc.?
What is his career/job?
What is his greatest strength?
What is his greatest weakness?

This is just a start, but you get the idea. Be very specific about who he is.

After you nail down your target person - also called an avatar - you will probably be editing the description as you go. Just think, when you meet someone, you learn some basic things right away. As you talk and get to know them, your description of them become deeper and more clear.

I met my wife in January of 2000, and we’ve been married for 12 years. I know more about her now than I did 15 years ago.

As you move along the podcasting journey, you may be able to broaden your audience to include additional demographics. Instead of just a 30-year old accountant with a wife and 2 kids, you may start reaching other 30-something men that have office jobs. Or you may start reaching those that are 30-50 years old. As you grow, just make sure that you always come back to your avatar. He is the center of it all.

Knowing your audience is just the starting point. Next we’ll examine what you need to keep going through the tough times.
Know your why
Besides knowing your audience, you must know your why.

You need to have a “why” that is huge. Podcasting can be a slow-growing process.

Yes, there are plenty of stories of people that started a podcast and things took off for them: they had thousands of downloads, money started coming, and they became famous overnight. However, this is the exception rather than the rule. And usually, these “overnight successes” are a result of years of strategy, skill, time, and money.

Most likely, you will have smaller numbers. You won’t be bringing in money for a few months or even a year. You won’t reach that celebrity status. You’ll be putting your time and money into podcasting and see little results.

Mar 13, 2015

This session kicks off the 3rd semester of the Creative Studio Academy. We'll be covering how to podcast. It will be directed mostly toward new podcasters, giving you the basics tools and information to get started with podcasting - hopefully avoiding the pitfalls and difficulties.

In this session, we'll be talking with Zac Bob from the Crowdfund Genius and Crowdfunding Comebacks podcasts. He is also one of the co-founders of OKpod15, a one-day podcasting event for small businesses in Oklahoma City. We'll talk about the importance of knowing your audience and knowing why you want to podcast. Both of these are key ingredients to make it passed the podcasting honeymoon phase.
Know your audience
I know you’re excited about starting your podcast, but there are several things you need to nail down first. The first and most important thing is your audience. It is the most important thing to know before your start, and it is still the most important thing as your grow and maintain.

At this point, you may or may not have an audience already. Maybe you already have a blog or YouTube channel with followers already. Maybe you just have a Facebook profile with some family and friends. Maybe you’re wondering what Facebook is.

No matter what your current status is, you need to figure out and understand who exactly you are trying to reach. This is a process of being very specific. Saying that you are targeting males 18-80 that love fishing is not good enough.

Here is one thing to think of to help you: your target audience is one person. Not one kind of person. One person.

That one person cannot fulfill every demographic or psychographic category. They cannot be 18 and 80 at the same time. They cannot live in the US and in Germany at the same time. Be very specific to describe this person.

Here’s some questions to help you get started:

What is his/her name? (that’s right - a name)
How old is he?
Is he married? How long?
Does he have kids? How many? Names, ages, etc.?
What is his career/job?
What is his greatest strength?
What is his greatest weakness?

This is just a start, but you get the idea. Be very specific about who he is.

After you nail down your target person - also called an avatar - you will probably be editing the description as you go. Just think, when you meet someone, you learn some basic things right away. As you talk and get to know them, your description of them become deeper and more clear.

I met my wife in January of 2000, and we’ve been married for 12 years. I know more about her now than I did 15 years ago.

As you move along the podcasting journey, you may be able to broaden your audience to include additional demographics. Instead of just a 30-year old accountant with a wife and 2 kids, you may start reaching other 30-something men that have office jobs. Or you may start reaching those that are 30-50 years old. As you grow, just make sure that you always come back to your avatar. He is the center of it all.

Knowing your audience is just the starting point. Next we’ll examine what you need to keep going through the tough times.
Know your why
Besides knowing your audience, you must know your why.

You need to have a “why” that is huge. Podcasting can be a slow-growing process.

Yes, there are plenty of stories of people that started a podcast and things took off for them: they had thousands of downloads, money started coming, and they became famous overnight. However, this is the exception rather than the rule. And usually, these “overnight successes” are a result of years of strategy, skill, time, and money.

Most likely, you will have smaller numbers. You won’t be bringing in money for a few months or even a year. You won’t reach that celebrity status. You’ll be putting your time and money into podcasting and see little results.

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